creative media & digital culture
@ washington state university, vancouver

Student Art Work
Exhibit 17
12.14
Animated Explanations

: CMDC students use animation, haptic design and infographics to explain complex issues and topics.


The Nouspace Student Research Gallery is a showcase for exemplary work of CMDC students. Each issue highlights projects that demonstrate digital innovation at the levels of development (code and software expertise), design and social engagement. DTC students work individually and collaboratively to try to solve problems, engage and inform communities and/or create cultural artifacts that speak to the changing intersections between art, technology, and the humanities. This gallery chronicles the growth and direction of the CMDC Program as well as the development of the field of digital media. Remembering where we came from helps us to know what the potentials may be as we invent the future.

- The Faculty of The CMDC

Exhibit 17 / Animation / 12.14

Animated Explanations

Issue 17 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery highlights the work of CMDC students using animation, haptic design and infographics to explain complex issues and topics.

In Professor Brenda Grell's 2D Animation class, students were tasked with creating an animated infographic about a social, political, or cultural topic they are passionate about and demonstrate their creative use of storytelling, data collection, visualization of data, typography, as well as animation in their projects.

In Dr. Dene Grigar's Design and Composition class, student groups created interactive installations involving a Kinect Game System using HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, and Osculator. In the Senior Seminar, seniors produced a transmedia educational environment that includes augmented reality, 3D simulations, virtual reality, and app technology created Unity Editor 4.6.0f3, Mono Developer 4.0.1, Vuforia Editor 3.0, Creative Cloud 2014: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, MS Paint, Maya 2013 & 2014, Blender v2.71, Apple SDK or Xcode 6.1.1, and Android SDK 5.0.

These works demonstrate the range of possibilities in employing moving images, moving text and even body movement to illuminate, persuade and inform.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor

Dustin Speer

Music Industry Infographic

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC336- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"Complications I had encountered while working on this project consisted of timing, placement, structure, and organization. I had 20+ illustrations I was working with in After Effects, and about half-way through my project it became very easy to accidentally misplace or move a layer. As frustrating as it is to have to go back and redo what I had already done, sometimes 2-4x, I somehow survived. Further on through the project I added more sound effects, which became a complete nuisance when I had to go back and change the placement of the layers so they aligned. Upon completion I realized I had about 30 different folders consisting of my works progress, due to frequent file compiling. Now that I am done, I can finally see the background image on my desktop! What a relief!" -Dustin Speer

Brianna Patin

Spiritual Leader Teacher

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC336- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"" -Brianna Patin

Shane Sanders

Are GMOs Safe?

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC338- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"The goal of the animation is to educate the general public on the extensive research within the scientific community that declares genetically modified organisms (GMOs) safe for human consumption. The idea for the piece manifested itself out of personal curiosity on the subject. Prior to working on this piece, my opinion on GMOs was relatively neutral and I chose to educate myself on them based on scientific research. The greatest obstacle for this project was figuring out how to present complex scientific information in an interesting and engaging way that helps to hold audience interest in the subject. The clear voiceover, coupled with simple and interesting graphic elements, helps to achieve this goal.The greatest success while working on the project was distilling the complex information down to the essentials for the viewer while maintaining the qualifying information for each claim made within the animation." -Shane Sanders

Katie Gullans

Lack of Funding for the Arts

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC338- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"I started off with the idea that the very beginning would be a drawing and a person playing an instrument in the drawing. I wanted to open with that so it would set up what the topic was going to be about. It made sense because it was about the arts in schools. Originally, I didn't plan on making the rest of the animation in paper, except for the idea that the paper person would be running across scenes. I changed things like that, but was still able to follow through my storyboard." -Katie Gullans

Matt Lyons

Kickstarter Infographic

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC338- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"For this project I decided to limit myself... I took this open project and turned it into a client job, in this case I decided to make it a motion graphics project for the company Kickstarter. Starting out, I had ideas for single transitions and text animations that I wanted to do, going from there I sketched them out in order to figure out their place in the particular project. This process made this project really fun to complete. I came up with the concept of having it actually being a story about two different people (bob and sally) and how kickstarter can solve their problems. Bob being an inventer would be able to get money for starting production of his product while sally could get start up costs covered for her business." -Matt Lyons

Christopher Ellis

Exoplanets

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC338- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"" -Christopher Ellis

Joshua Davenport

Ebola Infographic

Adobe AfterEffects, Adobe Illustrator
DTC338- 2D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

"For my project I choose to create an info graphic animation for the disease Ebola. The video starts by describing what Ebola is and where it originated, as well as the people it is effecting in Africa. Some of the techniques I used to portray the information was going off a welcoming color scheme that is fairly easy on the eyes, while showing basic texts and simple graphics that were made mostly in adobe illustrator so the viewer could quickly make the connections of the visuals with the points being made in the voiceover. I used lots of transform options to alter my layers position, opacity, and scale throughout the video to draw the viewers attention where I intended it to be needed." -Joshua Davenport

Student Art Work

Amalia Vacca, Michael Keck, Alicia Uhacz, Kevin Athey, Crystal Millard, Travis Petersen, Autumn Sailer, Josh Thomas, Brittany Wouden, Ashley Castino, Daren Moriarty, Angela Morrelli, Christine Waller, Adam Denny, Frankie Dunn, Patrick Dunn, Joshua Kim, Jason Tsai, Stephen Palermini, Alexandra Backous, Christopher Ellis, Erik Hansen, Colin Miletich


Life Renewed

HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, Osculator
DTC 497- Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar

installation (no link)

The Mount St. Helens Science & Learning Center's "Life Renewed" is a transmedia educational environment that tells the story about the rebirth of life on Mount St. Helens following the 1980 eruption through games and other forms of information via touch screen installation, mobile devices, and augmented reality stickers. The project was designed and produced by 23 seniors in the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver, under the guidance of scientists and educators from Mount St. Helens Science and Learning Center, the Mount St. Helens Institute and the Creative Media and Digital Culture program.

Student Art Work

Randi Higbie, Alyssa Korinke, Kenneth David Warren Marshall II-, Kate Palermini, Joel Tandberg, Jason Wendland

Diminished

HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, Osculator
DTC 336- Design and Composition, Prof. Dene Grigar

installation (no link)

Diminished was created as an assignment in the Fall 2014 Design and Composition class taught by Dr. Dene Grigar. As a final project, we were charged with creating a gesturally focused art installation based around the idea of the power of water. We saw that the power of water is in its necessity to sustain and support life. As clean water becomes more scarce, its power increases greatly.

Our installation was created as a digital, interactive piece to be experienced through the X-Box Kinect. Video elements were used to coincide with the poem. As the poem begins, water is abundant and filled with life; however, towards the end of the poem water is a more scarce resource. This idea is shown in the video through large water elements at the beginning and deserts at the end. The video's use of color complements this narrative by using green and blue colors at the beginning to signify its abundance, and by the end of the poem more browns and oranges are shown to symbolize a dried up world.

The animations were built in Adobe After Effects, with videos edited in Adobe Premier, images created using Adobe Photoshop, and sound design in Audacity. We then used Oscillator and Big Brother to trigger multimedia events for each section of the poem as the physical gestures are performed.

Student Art Work

Alan Hwang, Alyssa Karnes, Andrew Johnson, Chris Pacanins, Justin Williams, Varity Schwartz

Enter Light Enter Night

HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, Osculator
DTC 336- Design and Composition, Dr. Dene Grigar

installation (no link)

Our original inspiration came from the Disney Classic Fantasia, specifically the scene when Mickey, wearing the Wizard's hat, controls a vast amount of water. This thought of controlling the power of water, brought us to the idea of controlling an entire storm. From the rain and wind to the lightning and thunder, the idea of being able to thrust your hand out and produce thunder is a powerful thought and thus our project was born. Justin, who is a metal rock fan, suggested we use a song like Metallica's Enter Sandman to convey the power behind controlling the storm. We knew we wanted to play with lights and darkness, but we were not quite sure how to do this until Alan found the Lightmation video. Chris went to work cutting up the video and audio and putting pieces of it back together to tell our story.

We are all DTC majors, with the exception of Alan who is a business major minoring in DTC. With this diverse set of talents each member of our group brings a unique perspective to our design. Justin, Andrew, and Alyssa all did the coding; Chris and Alan handled design; Varity managed the project and collect assets; and we all contributed to the overall concept. Greg Philbrook also assisted us with specialized programing for the interactive design, and for that we owe him special thanks as we would not have gotten this far without him.

Student Art Work

Anna Swan, Payton Standfill, Dan Asbridge, Alex Backous

The Poetry of Life

HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, Osculator
DTC 336- Design and Composition, Dr. Dene Grigar

installation (no link)

The concept behind The Poetry of Life began by assessing the power of water with ideas of playfulness as well as water's association with cycles in both the natural and mechanical world. Other topics that were discussed were the powers associated with nature's elements of water, earth, fire and wind, with extra attention to the duality of water and fire. Through these ideas a story formed about the elements creating a cycle of growth in nature.

Each segment of the story uses an analogous color palette--reds and orange for the fire, blues and grey for the rain, and greens for the forest. The colors correspond to the element and mood of each phase, and work against each other to help the piece stand out. The use of animation and video was another use of juxtaposition. It was a chance to bring in some of the playfulness we wanted the piece to have, as well as to show the duality of video and computer animation and how they can interact together. The cycle is created by a series of motions performed by the viewer, drawing them in and making them part of the artwork. Once the fire begins--kicked off by the user entering the forest--he or she is instructed to crouch down and mimic the way a forest may be reduced. Next comes the rainstorm, and the viewer is then directed to stand up with arms raised. This motion triggers the regrowth of the forest and mimics the action of flowers springing up out of the earth. These motions put the user in control of the forest and allow them to become a part of the cycle of nature.

Student Art Work

Yuriy Kuprikov, Viktoria Sokolova, Jason Willmore, Randy Luttrell, Johnathan Turley

Jazz Hands

HTML5, CSS3, JS, Little Brother, Osculator
DTC 336- Design and Composition, Dr. Dene Grigar

installation (no link)

The night swallows the last few remaining rays of sunshine in the swamps. Little fireflies, as if on cue, emerge into the night, playfully swinging their incandescent tails. As you step past the Oak trees, you hear a pulsating rhythm, a beat. The sound of Jazz brings the night to life. Our multimedia installation is called Jazz Hands. The ultimate goal for this project was to get the user to experience a night out in New Orleans. We choose a New Orleans theme primarily because of the kind of music that is played there: Jazz. As the user walks into the Kinect field of view, a New Orleans jazz beat starts playing. The screen also displays three icons with three different instruments. Different hand positions trigger the Kinect to play a different instrument. HTML, CSS, Java Script and Photoshop were used in creating the website, the animations and the overall programming behind the piece.

Exhibit 16 / Scroll Narration / 9.14

Scroll Narration

Issue 16 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery highlights the work of students in DTC477, Advanced Multimedia Authoring. A continuation of DTC355, DTC477 expands upon students' knowledge of HTML and CSS by emphasizing responsive design, an approach to designing web sites so that they adjust to different device widths (phone, tablet and desktop). Students also learn the foundation of web programming, JavaScript and jQuery, in order to create dynamic pages and animation effects and to explore the possibilities of programming the navigation of web books.

Along with these important web authoring skills, students explore a popular feature in contemporary web design. Scroll animation, or parallax scrolling, started out as a visual effect to create the illusion of depth on a web page. The technique has now become a compelling model for navigating and simultaneously reading a multimedia text. With scroll animation, the interface of text, image, video and audio can dynamically change with the user's one continuous forward or backward movement, rather than through clicking links. Why is this is important? Because it is difficult to design a link in reverse. Navigation bars and back buttons have been so prevalent on the web, because a user/reader needs to orient herself in the text. Reading, especially reading a narrative or developed idea, requires the trace or map of what is read so that the text can be easily accessed as a whole. Scroll animation gets its narrative power by limiting the possibilities for the user, while simultaneously increasing the users access to the whole of the text.

The student works featured in this issue demonstrate the range of possibilities in applying scroll animation to narratives. Students conceptualized a multimedia story and then designed and programmed the scroll narration of that story.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Caleb Nymeyer

The Tangled Frozen Theory

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


This project was created to illustrate the relationship between Disney's Tangled, Frozen, and the Little Mermaid. The stories are told in a simplified fashion to emphasize the core theory of the movie's relationships with each other. -Caleb Nymeyer

Student Art Work

Kelsea Rothaus

The Plague

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


Human Nature is to yearn for immediate gratification, not taking into account the cost to future generations. By our own greed, we accelerate the deterioration of earth. The process in creating this narrative was a long one. It began with the idea of a poem which spawned into illustrations that were created by using Illustrator. Many of the images are augmented images from online sources, but the majority are original. The next step was to analyze the structure of the "Walking Dead" site to see how they implemented the skrollr plug-in to make certain images seem to "animate". After inserting the characteristics of that site into my own, I worked to add data-point transitions that mimicked what was going on in the story. Using a combination, of layering and changing the opacity and position, the special effects were achieved. -Kelsea Rothaus

Student Art Work

Ricky Leitner

Peyton Manning

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Despite being a computer nerd my whole life, I inherited my family's absolute devotion to Colorado sports teams. This was helped by fond childhood memories of the Denver Broncos and Colorado Avalanche being led to success by great leaders like John Elway and Joe Sakic. While the 2000s were a depression for Colorado sports, signing Peyton Manning completely revitalized the Broncos franchise and breathed new life into their hopes of becoming champions once again. Building my site's narrative on the career of Manning had many benefits. For one, it's a theme that my family would enjoy reading about, so I kept them in mind as I made certain decisions throughout the process. Also, when discussing Manning's storied and lengthy career, a lack of content was far from being an issue. All of that aside, Manning has been a huge source of excitement in my life recently, so it was fun going more in-depth with his story and what makes him so great. Manning's career going from Tennessee's orange to the Colts' blue and concluding with Broncos' orange was too convenient to pass up, and made for an effective color scheme that transitioned well into one another. I picked fonts that were bold and would feel familiar to the football and collegiate brands. This was probably the most fun I've had with a project thus far, and I'm proud of the results. - Ricky Leitner

Student Art Work

Corrine Murphy

Pokémon Regions in Japan

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


The purpose of this website was to inform users about the regions in the Pokémon games that were based on real locations in Japan using a scrolling narrative format. Some challenges I faced while building this website included implementing skrollr on only the container, understanding Google Maps and customizing the markers and applying jQuery to create this section. All of these challenges required additional research and correspondence with my professor to overcome. The biggest challenge that I am still working on is getting my website to be fully responsive. Though it works on the desktop, I am still working on perfecting the tablet and mobile platforms. Regardless, I had a fun time creating this website and am proud of my accomplishment. - Corrine Murphy

Student Art Work

Caleb Carroll

Rhasmagian

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


The objective of this assignment was to build a narrative-driven website optimized for tablets. It acted as our final project, wrapping up our course-long studies on HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and jQuery. Rhasmagian is a work of fiction, accounting the history of an alternative world and its inhabitants through text and dynamic images. I wrote the story as I coded the website, creating graphics in Adobe Illustrator along the way. I do not have much experience in animation; therefore, the greatest challenge in working on this project was bringing the motions and transitions I envisioned to life. Simply scroll down each page to progress through the story. As of May 2014, there are two chapters—the story is still in progress. - Caleb Carroll

Student Art Work

Mark Vantassel

Oscillating Muybridge

HTML5, CSS3 & Javascript
DTC477 - Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


This project grew from a desire to present something using 2D tools that appeared to be 3D. The core of that project can be viewed at Oscillate. This core function relies on Math.sin() to produce a wave, which I use to create the appearance of depth. My son, Grant, contributed to the math side of the problem solving. I also wanted to create a machine-like environment, and a set of gears made sense. I created a proof of concept in Adobe AfterEffects, rendered it in a series of 360 still frames, and created a simple Javascript program that would swap images when scrolling, like a flip-blook. The final version is not historically accurate: Zoetropes are typically mounted vertically, and Muybridge used a device of his own invention, called a Zoopraxiscope, to display this work. However, as a proof of concept and demonstration of the functionality of 'Oscillate,' it is compelling. - Mark Vantassel

Student Art Work

Caleb Carrol, Jennifer Shroy, Alan McGinnis, Ashley Castino, Adam Wang

Net Neutrality

HTML5, CSS3 & Javascript
DTC 475: Digital Diversity, Dr. Michael Rabby
project launch


We expect the Internet to be open and unbounded. It's been that way since the beginning, after all. When we connect to the Net, we can visit any website we want. We don't have to pay to access different sites, as we do with television channels. Net Neutrality, the fundamental principle of the Web, has given us equal access all these years. Why would we want to change that?...

Exhibit 15 / Community Outreach / 5.14

Community Outreach

Issue 15 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery features digital projects by CMDC students that engage with local Vancouver organizations and communities. Whether it is getting middle school students excited about digital technology and entrepreneurship, coding a website for a local music school, county sheriff's office, business publication or national park, or documenting the workings of the local food bank, these projects, and others like them, challenge our students to step out of their comfort zones in front of a computer monitor.

CMDC students have the freedom to explore their own creative potential, to experiment with digital media and to successfully "fail" in these experiments. Collaborating on projects for and with local organizations (with real needs) gives students other skills that are just as important as creatively coding and designing. The students involved with these community outreach projects, took research field trips, held meetings with clients, presented ideas, built prototypes, listened to feedback, redesigned based on this feedback, delivered a digital product on deadline and were accountable to themselves and others at every step in the process.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Brittany Wouden, Amalia Vacas, Mychael Jones, Steve Palermini, Angela Morrelli, and Frankie Dunn

Pop-Up Gallery

Aurasma - Augmented Reality
DTC 497 Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch


The Pop Up Gallery: Jobs That Don't Exist Yet is a mobile gallery presented through augmented reality technology. The theme of the project, generated from participation in the National Collegiate Innovators and Inventors Association Innovation Fellowship, emphasizes the need for entrepreneurship and innovation among students and stresses the importance of a college education through a kinesthetic and engaging activity. It asks the question, is augmented reality an effective means of education for students, particularly in a K-12 environment? The Pop Up Gallery Team developed a gallery show focused on entrepreneurship and innovation in order to understand and answer this question.

Student Art Work

DTC 475 students

Opera Quest NW

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC 475 - Digital Diversity, Prof. Michael Rabby
project launch



For this class-wide project, students divided into teams to design, produce and code a website for the Vancouver Children's Opera, an organization that connects school-age children throughout the greater Vancouver area to the arts, specifically opera. Participating students: Daren Moriarty, Alexander Montgomery, Katherine Gullans, Jenel Cohen, Morgan Brice , Maxine Damore, Josh Thomas, Derick Lock, Benjamin Longbons, Steve Breland, Trevor Elliott, Cami Peterson, Kathryn Christopher, Stephanie Venturella, Kaitlyn Wise, Jayme Shoun, Nicholas Bare, Jared Abraham

Student Art Work

Lucas Wiseman, Amanda Bonduraunt, Madison Watson and Crystal Millard

Fort Vancouver Mobile Project: Old Apple Tree Module

Sample slideshow for mobile app
ComJour 333, Prof. Brett Oppegaard
project launch


This project was designed to extend the Old Apple Tree module on the existing Fort Vancouver Mobile app. We picked three places along that path that, based on their geo-coordinates, will trigger the intended audio and slideshow content. Each of the pieces is designed to give a bigger picture of what the apple orchard stands for, and why it is significant to preserve the past for future generations. Here is a sample slideshow from this module. - Lucas Wiseman

Student Art Work

Whitney Anderson, Wes Halverson, Katie Fennelly, Chelsea Parkhurst, Pauline Ramos, Josh Turner, Lake Konopaski

Book of Lists

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC 497 Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch


In an effort to improve and expand upon the experience current and future subscription holders have with the printed version of the Book of Lists, the Vancouver Business Journal has asked CMDC students to help bring their printed resource into a digital format. Developed in conjunction with Washington State University Vancouver and Instructional Technologies, Inc., The Multimedia Book of Lists displays a clean and simple interactive experience that provides users with the tools to search, sort through, and save listings for future use. With integrated tap-to-call functionality, users can now immediately get in touch with potential clients or contractors effortlessly. Student-created clickable and animated advertisements give businesses the opportunity to engage with their intended audience in a more dynamic way than traditional static ads. An elegant and responsive design, progressive functionality, and creatively captivating advertisements all come together to help bring the Vancouver Business Journal into the digital age with grace. The finished product includes a "proof of concept" package that can be used as a template for other business journals. The full package is comprised of a client side interface and sign in page that will be filled with database information by Instructional Technology Inc., 15 multimedia advertisements, a promotional email, as well as social media and promotional resources.

Student Art Work

Melina Jesser, Brian Idle, Glenda Rothfus, George Olson, Evan Flanagan, Aaron Wintersong

Virtual Precinct: Clark County Washington Sheriff's Office

HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript
DTC497 Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch

This project was based on the vision of a "virtual precinct" that would provide a more enjoyable experience for using services that the Clark County Sheriff's Office provides, as well as including imagery and content that informs the public about the office and its functions. It is a responsive, single-page website that is dynamic and easy to navigate.

Melina Jesser, Project Manager
Brian Idle, Content Specialist
Glenda Rothfus, Lead Designer
George Olson, Lead Coder
Evan Flanagan, Social Media Specialist
Aaron Wintersong, Project Advisor

Student Art Work

Dustin Speer

Defeating Hunger in Clark County

Video
COMJOUR466 - Video for News, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


I chose to film a short documentary about fighting hunger in Clark County. I first sat down with the program manager at Clark County Food Bank, and discussed my outline and plan for this video. From there I was set to go, for she had set me up with times to film at the food bank, as well as providing contacts for agencies in Clark County. I had initially planned on interviewing some of the homeless or "hungry" people at these facilities, but most of them didn't want to be filmed, and the more I was told "NO", the less I kept asking, resulting in zero interviews from them. I got about 5 interviews, as well as a few words from other volunteers. I learned a lot from this assignment. Most importantly, more video is better than less, and "just ask" people. There were times were I could have filmed, but I didn't, and I regretted it in the editing process. My favorite part of working with this assignment was filming the B role and incorporating the "small" things, such as the eggs, the laughter, and most of all the emotions that show the viewer that the volunteers really care about giving to the community. - Dustin Spear

Exhibit 14 / Thirteen Ways / 1.7.14

Thirteen Ways

Issue 14 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery features the first assignment that CMDC students must complete in DTC355/Multimedia Authoring, a rigorous (and fun) introduction to hand-coding websites, using HTML5 and CSS3, and to the basic principles of visual and interactive design. The assignment is to build a single-page web site of Wallace Stevens' poem "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird." Each stanza in the poem has a unique poetic voice and style (difference), but its central image of the blackbird makes a unity out of the parts (repetion). The poem's design is a demonstration of the challenge of the assignment: how to design a visual text with difference and repetition.

Students begin with formatting and structuring semantic content of the page, such as the header, stanzas, bio, and footer. They then work at design by applying a layout, color scheme, imagery and typography. What at first is a significant challenge for many students - especially those that are new to computer languages and/or visual design - becomes an expressive and creative exercise to bring the poem to life online. This selection of thirteen "blackbird" student projects, out of the hundreds of projects over the past three years in DTC355, gives a sense of the variety of voices and styles of CMDC students.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Daniel Spung

Blackbird I

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




Student Art Work

Whitney Anderson

Blackbird II

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




Student Art Work

Shane Sanders

Blackbird III

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




Student Art Work

Adam Denny

Blackbird IV

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




Student Art Work

Chelsea Parkhurst

Blackbird V

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




Student Art Work

Jake Melara

Blackbird VI

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Adele Dandeneau

Blackbird VII

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Erik Hansen

Blackbird VIII

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Franky Dunn

Blackbird IX

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Jenny Foster

Blackbird X

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Kevin Athey

Blackbird XI

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Luke Wiseman

Blackbird XII

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Sarah Robison

Blackbird XIII

HTML5 & CSS3
DTC 355 - Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Exhibit 13 / Multimedia Books / 9.13

Multimedia Books

The projects in Issue 13 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery were all developed in the iPublishing Summer Initiative 2013 (iPSI 2013). Envisioned as both a "think tank" and "sandbox" to explore the possibilities of new models of publishing, the initiative gave seven students (Alexandrea Chaudoin, Katie Fennelly, Jennifer Hanson, Mychael Jones, Chelsea Parkhurst, Daniel Spung, and Amalia Vacca) the opportunity to take three core DTC courses that focused on designing, authoring and publishing web-based digital books. With the generous support of Instructional Technologies, Inc., iPSI 2013 fellows received full tuition for three courses, along with additional support for instructional materials.

The goal of the initiative was for students to 1) model ideas for digital textbook design based on the book/chapter/section structure and 2) to explore more creative possibilities for organizing and presenting multimedia books. Students explored a variety of digital affordances that would enhance reading and learning, while remaining unobtrusive. In DTC 336 Design & Composition and DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, iPSI fellows (along with non-fellows) worked on the following:

  1. notes: a sliding notes panel where students can retain highlighted passages and their own (or a professor's) notes on the reading. these notes could be saved, emailed or printed for later use
  2. multi-color highlighting: a sliding colors panel allows selection of color, which is retained in highlighted passages sent to notes.
  3. progress bar & bookmarks: a variety of ways to show position within a chapter
  4. text animations: hide/reveal applied to content that involves deeper/slower reading, ie. samples of paraphrasing; highlighted text that can be synchronized with an author's audio explanation; moving text blocks to grab reader's attention
  5. segmentation of content: breaking up the chapter into stylistically distinct blocks for ease of reading and global understanding of chapter structure
  6. interactive quizzes: true or false questions to test reader's understanding through the chapter
  7. video/audio content: a video (prototype only) that introduces the chapter with author's voice and a demonstration of paraphrasing
  8. progressive & adaptive design: design of content that adapts to different devices - including phone, tablet and desktop - so that students can read in different contexts

In DTC 338 Multimedia Publishing, iPSI fellows and non-iPSI students, experimented with integrating multimedia content into an HTML5 "book." In an effort to think beyond both traditional book and traditional web design, short creative assignments focused on the following areas:

  1. spatial text: arrange text spatially on the screen, provide typographic and other visual cues (positioning, font, size, style, white-space, etc.) and sequencing for the reader to "perform" a path through the text, rather than follow a prescribed and author-controlled path of a typical column of text.
  2. visual book: use images - symbols (but not language), shapes, colors, drawings, graphics and/or photos - to build a coherent book. images are not to be used as illustrations for a pre-written story. instead, investigate new ways to organize images in order to get across a single idea.
  3. conceptual book: create a digital book using a set of instructions for the gathering of images and text (a "score") written by one of your classmates.
  4. cinematic book: design a narrative sequence using images, text and media (video or audio), using at least one of the continuity editing principles of cinema language.

The projects below are just a small selection of the many ideas explored in the summer initiative. The first five projects, explore the more creative approaches to multimedia book design using HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript. The last two projects, are examples of adapting a textbook chapter to a web-based book for different devices.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Daniel Spung

White Night

HTML5, CSS3 & Javascript/jQuery
DTC 338 - Multimedia Publishing, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




For this project, I set out to create a love letter to (i.e. blatantly rip-off) some of my favorite new and old-school games, including Dark Souls, Shadowgate and Mass Effect. Primarily, I wanted to create an interactive comic mixed with elements of old point-and-click adventure games. I purposefully left the controls somewhat vague, and omitted any form of obvious exposition or explanation of the "story." I believe that the fore- and background imagery alone can communicate events as they unfold little by little. I wanted to leave the viewer (player?) in a somewhat confused state; my hope is that they will construct their own narrative based around the images they see (another nod to Dark Souls). Also, because the "path" of the narrative splits in different directions – and events can unfold in different ways depending on interaction – the story may be slightly different for each person. There may even be more than one ending…

Student Art Work

Whitney Anderson

The Run

HTML/CSS, Adobe Illustrator
DTC 338 - Multimedia Publishing, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




In this digital book I tried to communicate the enjoyment, and the nagging inner voice that occurs while I am running. The design was inspired by the rhythm of running and the "thought snap shots" that are gathered while you are on a run. This digital book was created for the DTC Multimedia Publishing class at WSU Vancouver. The project was to create a digital book that used cinematic principles like eyeline match, the 180 degree rule, and continuity to create a narrative sequence.

Student Art Work

Alexandra Chaudoin

The Passion of the City

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript/jQuery and Adobe illustrator
DTC 338 - Multimedia Publishing, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




This is an HTML5 book where the user can drag the main character, the Detective, around an apartment to interact with the tenants. The goal is to find out which of the characters stole the Fire Topaz. Each character has his/her own passion and own thoughts about the Topaz. There are eight total pages in this book, including the character information page, the statement page, and the credits page.

Student Art Work

Amalia Vacca

The Spirit of Motion

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript/jQuery and Adobe illustrator
DTC 338 - Multimedia Publishing, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




The concept for the final piece was that of motion. I found an open source poem that was based on motion. I then looked into Kuler to come up with a color palette for the book. I decided early on that I would pick one color that would be used for all of the verbs in the poem. I decided to pull out all of the verbs in the poem and put them into a Google image search to come up with which images I would use. After choosing my pictures, I used Photoshop to give them all the same blue duotone color that I had used in the spatial text assignment. I placed them into an HTML document so that I could let the images scroll horizontally, giving a feeling of motion as the reader does so. I then decided to use CSS and its animation property to give each of the images different motions and placements. I then decided to give the verbs in the poem a button feature to give the reader the power to decide if they wanted to show and hide each of the images in their own timing.

Student Art Work

Chelsea Parkhurst

Trayvon

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript/jQuery and Adobe illustrator
DTC 338 - Multimedia Publishing, Prof. Will Luers
project launch




The goal for this conceptual book was to create a piece based on randomly drawn written instructions from an anonymous student. The instructions I received indicated that I was to take the top common news story from at least three different sources. This story happened to be about the case involving the shooting of Trayvon Martin. From there, I was to take the main image from one of those news stories and place it into a Google image search in order to find a similar image based on their recognition software. My next step was to take an image from the first page of my Google results and repeat the process so that I was two steps away from my original image. For the main body of text I was supposed to take three paragraphs from the article I chose and translate it using Google Translate five different times consecutively. The final text I used in my piece was translated from English to Norwegian, to Vietnamese, to Bosnian to French, and finally back to English. The title I used was a result of placing the headline of the original story into N+7, on online tool that replaces each noun with the seventh one following it in a dictionary.

I decided to sequence the images I found in the opposite order from the way that I discovered them from the top to the bottom of the page so that as the user scrolls down the imagery's relation to the content would increase and perhaps add context to the story over time. I tried to highlight my result through the use of color and font variation, but I also thought that is was important to add the original text so that the viewer could take part in piecing together the origins of my final work. The use of parallax scrolling was an attempt to make the viewer feel as if the content was being hidden and revealed to them asynchronously, just as it was for me.

Student Art Work

Jennifer Hansen, Alex Chaudoin

Chapter 5: Can You Say It?

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript/jQuery and Adobe illustrator
DTC 477 - Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Using a textbook chapter on paraphrasing, "Can You Say It?", students explored a variety of digital affordances that would enhance reading and learning, while remaining unobtrusive.

Student Art Work

Daniel Spung

Chapter 5: Can You Say It?

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript/jQuery and Adobe illustrator
DTC 477 - Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Using the textbook chapter on paraphrasing, "Can You Say It?", students explored a variety of digital affordances that would enhance reading and learning, while remaining unobtrusive.

Exhibit 12 / Collaboration / 6.13

Collaboration

Collaboration has always been central to the creation of digital objects. As with the production of industrial objects, digital objects require many levels of expertise and abstraction, from the design of front-end interfaces to the coding of back-end databases. While the CMDC program embraces hand-crafted singular visions, our students are given many oppourtunities to work together on larger projects.

Group projects allow students to contribute their individual strengths, learn new techniques and approaches from their colleagues, develop interpersonal skills and gain the professional confidence of working on projects that impact the greater community.

The three group projects highlighted in this issue of The Nouspace Student Gallery are all community-driven, creative projects that not only required a range of skill-sets to implement, but also balanced the need of invention with the specific needs of a community or organization.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Setareh Alizadeh, Spencer Watson, Cameron Whitman, Lia Thompson, Inhalee Bauer, and Aaron Hahn

#nextchapter

Wordpress, Javascript, Video, Twitter and Facebook
DTC Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch
view video about #nextchapter


#nextchapter, a citywide reading and discussion program held during March and April of 2013, was designed to spread digital literacy throughout the Vancouver, Washington community. The community read, workshops, lectures and discussions focused on the book, Program or be Programmed: 10 Commands of the Digital Age, by author Douglas Rushkoff. Rushkoff's ten commands raise ethical issues that individuals of all ages face when using digital interfaces and products. The #nextchapter team created a website with upcoming events, a mapped book tracker, a way to purchase or check out a book, multiple social media platforms, an opening launch event with entertainment, community engagement and media press releases, 5,000 informative bookmarks with discussion questions on the back, a label to track 1,000 books on our website, and a mobile app that has all the functionalities of our website. These tasks and more were all accomplished during a three month engagement in the project.

Student Art Work

Michael Chaudoin, Andrew Dizinno, Jason Cook, Stephanie Bailey, Morgan Hutchinson and Joshua Clem

CFSWW - augmented reality installation

Aurasma (AR platform), HTML/CSS, Video and Adobe Illustrator
DTC Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch



The project we created for the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington's (CFSWW) 2013 annual luncheon is an Augmented Reality (AR) environment that highlights philanthropy through contributions of community members by employing multimedia objects such as animations, infographics, and video that were produced by our three content specialists: Michael Chaudoin, Andrew Dizinno, and Joshua Clem. All media objects are loaded into Aurasma (our AR platform of choice) by our team's AR consultant Jason Cook, and accessed through a mobile device such as an iPad or smartphone. The media objects are introduced through "trigger images" which are displayed on 12 10'4' banners that our lead designer Stephanie Bailey composed using Adobe Illustrator CS6. In addition, an interactive website for the event was hand-coded by our web developer Emily Spannring to archive all media objects so that they may be further explored in the future. Project manager Morgan Hutchinson is responsible for guiding the development of all project elements and facilitating communication between the team and the CFSWW.

For more information about CFSWW's annual luncheon, please visit their website

Student Art Work

S. Beauchaine, S. Codi, D. McIntosh, J. Davidson, N. Rudy, J. Schmidt, J. LeBaron, C. Meyer and J. Wagner

The Spruce Mill Project

Video, HTML and Adobe Photoshop
ComJour333 Reporting Across Platforms, Prof. Brett Oppegaard
project launch


We started with an empty field, a 300 page document, and some images. Our assignment was to create media content for an app about the former Spruce Mill that occupied the field now adjacent to Fort Vancouver. The class divided into three groups, each with complete freedom to pursue any topic related to the Spruce Mill. With little defined direction the groups set forth to learn about something forgotten.

Some of us researched and read numerous documents (including old microfilm), while others spent hours editing, recording, writing, and designing. While in production, we learned about the historical resources available in our community and was surprised by the amount of content and subjects available to explore related to the Mill.

Exhibit 11 / Mobile Apps / 12.12

Mobile Apps

CMDC faculty strive to provide students with the foundations in digital practice and theory that will help them respond creatively and analytically to their community's digital needs.

In the area of mobile production and publishing, The CMDC program has been a leader in the Vancouver/Portland commmunity. Through the 2009 Mobile Tech Research Initiative, students built an app for Dick Hannah Dealerships. Dr. Brett Oppegaard continues his research with students in mobile app storytelling for the national historical park, The Fort Vancouver. With Autovation, a permanent exhibit for the Oregon Museum for Science and Industry, Dr. Dene Grigar led her students to develop an augmented reality app for the iPad. In classes, students have taken the initiative to build apps for local companies, advocacy groups and cultural/educational institutions.

What kind of app does a local coffee business need? How do you access datasbases for the needs of a local kiteflying community? What is the best user interface for urban paddlers, national park tourists or a visitors to downtown galleries? How can a whoduunit game bring opportunities for social interaction on campus? The digital works featured in this issue of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery are mobile web apps made by students in DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring. DTC 477 builds on the HTML/CSS skills developed in DTC 355 and provides a broad look at the various tools, design approaches and scripting languages (such as HTML5, CSS3, Javascript and jQuery) for creating mobile web apps. Four of the featured apps are local information resources that include maps, gallery images, directories and even local advertising as possible revenue sources. One is a mystery game that involves traveling the campus of Washington State University, Vancouver to pick up clues. These are all apps in various stages of development, as students want to continue working on them and getting them out into the world.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Aaron Wintersong

UrbanPaddle

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch (if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)



UrbanPaddle provides a mobile resource for paddle sport enthusiast who want information and maps of rivers and other water features within the city. My current development focus is centered on stylistic elements. The use of translucency and cool, gray-blue colors is intended to reflect the unique water evironment of the Pacific Northwest. The app is still in ongoing development. I intend to migrate the code to native platforms and to continue implementating the large amount of media and locations required. Please click on the image to see the current version.

Student Art Work

Nicole Buckner, Jennifer Hansen, Setareh Alizadeh

Galleries in Vancouver

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch(if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)


"Galleries in Vancouver" is a mobile application for android and iPhone devices dedicated to bringing visitors to downtown Vancouver, Wa art galleries. The mobile app offers a menu that navigates to three other pages within the app. "Gallery" leads users to a page with a ‘swipe feature' to view inside and outside images of each gallery. The second button "List" provides the user with a list of all the galleries with contact information for each gallery page. In addition to the "List" there is a comments page for users to post information about each gallery. Finally, the app also provides a google map plug in with markers of all of the galleries, and a geolocation feature for easier navigation.

Student Art Work

Ruth Stauffer, Joshua Wagner

Officer's Row Tour

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch(if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)


This app was built as part of a project for the DTC 477 Adv. Multimedia Authoring class. It uses images, some audio, and a map to help guide visitors on an ordered tour of Officer's Row. In addition to information about a location on the Row, the app also provides short bio's of various famous or infamous people who lived in or visited one of the houses. The app is only partially complete in the sense that there is far more history and features that could be added. Content and feature may be added in future classes and/or projects. The plan is for this app to grow.

Student Art Work

Spencer Watson

KiteMap

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch(if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)


I recreated the site KiteMap.org as a mobile web-app. The app features search via user location and address, a simplistic design, contact forms, submit forms, a slide in menu, and advertisements.The major pieces of this project were working with the menu, advertisements, search, and JSON structure. The menu is a modified plugin that took some work to get working properly with the desired look. The advertisements took some time getting the advertisement to display on the footer and randomize on each visit. I coded the advertisement section from scratch. The search function uses a storefinder plugin. I modified this to display properly for mobile devices, and to work well for this context. The search plugin utilizes .json as the source of data for the locations. I am using this .json format to allow the site to hold a large amount of data, without being particularly heavy, and without requiring a large amount of hand coding.

Student Art Work

Emily Spannring

Whodunnit?

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch(if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)


In this mobile web application designed for DTC 477, WSU Vancouver students are encouraged to put their knowledge of the campus to the test in a Carmen Sandiego inspired crime solving game. As per the requirements of the course the application features the Google Maps API with custom markers to navigate through WSU Vancouver and solve the crime. The application features animations created with jQuery and forms coded in JavaScript with Notepad++ and Textwrangler. Adobe Photoshop was used to resize and isolate all of the images. The most challenging portion of the design was to create alternate pathways for incorrect locations and properly use callback functions when animating elements. Adept users will be able to solve the crime within nine pages yet this is less than half of the total content created. For future development I intend to update the application with more crimes to solve and explore the possibility of adding sound.

Student Art Work

Cameron Whitman, Maxine Damore

Black Rock Cafe

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, jQuermobile
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch(if opening in a browser, narrow the width to simulate a mobile device)


The Black Rock Coffee app consists of six different page types including a home screen, RSS feed, contact form, map/store listings page, menu, and directions/store and bio pages. The app was created with Jquery Mobile and consists of HTML, CSS, Javascript and Google Maps API. Included in the app is a "get directions" feature integrating Google's navigation abilities. The app was presented to Black Rock Coffee Bar on December 7th, 2012 and a version will be made by Cameron Whitman and used by Black Rock Coffee Bar.

Exhibit 10 / Digital Narrative / 09.12

Digital Narrative

CMDC students, in almost all of their classes, explore forms of digital narrative. Narrative is perhaps the most familar form of communiation. We share anecdotes daily, consume stories across an array of media and discuss our appreciation for the subtleties of narrative art in novels, movies and television. But in many ways, narrative is the most difficult to teach within the context of computer-based digital media. How does one "tell a story" in a work that includes multiple links and media files? What are the narrative limitations and new possibilities of building and distributing nonlinear narratives? How should a narrative function when it is consumed in a networked environment, when another story is just a click away? These are questions that we ask students to examine in their creations, whether in a work of video, of journalism, of animation or of webdesign.

The digital works featured in this issue of the newly named Nouspace Student Research Gallery - named to coincide with the opening of The Nouspace Gallery and Media Lounge - are "narrative" in that they are time-based structures with beginnings, middles and ends. Two are "experimental" (a video story told with text and an animation about inanimate objects); and three are more "traditional" nonfiction narratives that use juxtapositions of video and text. All of the works push boundaries of what we term "narrative" in subtle and interestings ways.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Marzee Dyer (text) and Jason Cook (video)

Britnee Kellogg: Fueling the Dream at Both Ends

text and video
COM 295, Dr. Brett Oppegaarde
project launch


"The following is a profile article I did for the required COM 295 course in the Communication minor. Students were tasked with selecting and securing a profile interview with a person in our chosen field, as well as multiple interviews with outside sources to cite in the piece. I was able to get an interview with Vancouver local, Season 11 American Idol Contestant, Britnee Kellogg. Research told me that Kellogg's previous interviews only skimmed the basic information of who she was and what her American Idol experience was like. Despite the varying pieces that covered her in the past, none made me feel like I knew her as a person. I didn't have a human connection to her, and wanted to achieve that in my piece. I also wanted to show the controversial side of her pursuing music as a single mom, raising two boys. The hard part was creating a cohesive work that was focused and well balanced, while giving a larger picture of who this person was and what she was facing. There was a lot to consider. I was surprised with how the piece came together. The actual writing process proved to be very organic and came together quite easily. I think this was due to the ground work of thorough research, asking the right questions, and building a good rapport with those interviewed. " - Marzee Dyer

Student Art Work

Greg Philbrook

Collection

video: LiveType & Final Cut Pro
DTC 354 Digital Storytelling, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch



"Collection is a short, text driven video about the self-imposed loneliness of a man living behind his video camera. Though a technically simple piece made entirely in LiveType and Final Cut, this brief narrative exposes a raw, unwavering feeling of regret and helplessness." - Greg Philbrook

Student Art Work

Diana Brown

A Ministry of Friendship

video: Final Cut Pro
COM 466 Video for News and Documentary, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


"My learning challenges in the project were multiple because I had never used a video camera prior to the class. I self taught myself to use the iMovie application by studying online tutorials and videos. From the class lectures, I gained concept ideas about editing. I overcame my total lack of knowledge regarding camera angles and audio by reading the class textbooks and listening to Prof. Luers explanations about what constitutes good video. Finally the challenges and experience of trying to get good video from real life situations was very vital. Each lesson brought new understanding which helped make the next video field event more fruitful." - Diana Brown

Student Art Work

Bryan Ruhe

The Making of a Clothbound Release

website, video
DTC 355 Multimedia Authoring
Prof. Will Luers
project launch


"This website was built primarily using DIV-based HTML and CSS, but also uses a small bit of jQuery for the drop-down menu. The process of creating just one of the books is quite long and involved, so it seemed only fitting to create and include sequential, sped-up videos of the creation process. The hope is that this emphasizes the amount of care and time involved in making each one." - Bryan Ruhe

Student Art Work

A. J. Robertson

Chess Animation

3D animation, video
COM 466 Video for News and Documentary, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch


"This project, being my first 3D project, turned out better than expected. Although not technically perfect, the animation tell a conclusive story with an unexpected ending. Lots was learned about the software and work flow within a short period of time. If more time was given, the textures would be parented correctly and animations smoothed out. Overall, I am happy with the quality and complexity of the project with the amount of time given and no prior knowledge of the software." - A. J. Robertson

Exhibit 09 / Digital Objects / 04.12

Digital Objects

There are currently 14 forms/genres of digital media:

  1. Websites
  2. Virtual Worlds
  3. Virtual Reality
  4. Multimedia
  5. Computer Games
  6. Interactive Installations
  7. Computer Animation
  8. Digital Video
  9. Digital Cinema
  10. Human-Computer Interface
  11. Digital Music/Sound (includes podcasts)
  12. Internet Radio
  13. Digital Photography
  14. Digital Television

The projects in issue 9 of the Student Research Gallery demonstrate the innovation, the responsiveness to community and civic issues, and the range and of digital objects produced in CMDC classes. Nicole Buckner used Google Maps to create a national multimedia map of Occupy Wall Street activity. Aaron Wintersong and Greg Philbrook created games that raise moral questions. Geoff Wallace created an Arduino sensor-based drumkit that acts as an interface to a multimedia performance. The Autovation team worked with Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) and Dick Hannah Dealerships to create a 3D simulation for a car exhibit. Students from The Mobile Tech Research Initiative (MTRI) worked together through four classes in the summer of 2011 to produce the first CMDC native iOS and Android app for Dick Hannah Dealerships.

As the CMDC program grows alongside the growth and impact of digital technology in all facets of daily life, we encourage students to find new aesthetic and meaningful forms that integrate media, and that engage users with a wider community.

- Will Luers, visiting professor


Student Art Work

Nicole Buckner

Occupy Global Map

Google Maps
DTC 338 Social Media, Dr. Kathi Berens
project launch



"The "Occupy Global Map" is an ongoing collaborative research project that involved several students from a WSU-V social media class. The students researched and added information related to the 2011 Occupy Wall Street Movement to an interactive Google Map. The map is a functional guide that includes links, photos, and videos to organize and illustrate Occupy events. Contributed Content by: Nicole Buckner, Mark VanTassel, Madi Kozacek, Vernon Blystone and Kathleen Schultheis, Saundra Beauchaine, Katie Campbell, Phil MacArthur, and Zachary Stahlr." - Nicole Buckner

Student Art Work

Aaron Wintersong

Puppet

Adobe Premiere Pro, Reaper(x64) Digital Audio Workstation 
DTC 338 Games for Art, Prof. Kathi Rick
project launch


"The Puppet game-world explores the effects of our current economy, driven by consumption, on the daily life of the individual. Specifically, it examines the relationship between those who possess significant capital advantage and those who have few economic resources. In essence, Puppet is a social experiment carried out in an environment that could be described a live-action role playing game with a gambling twist.  It allows players to make money by subjecting a person, the puppet, to debasement and privation. The intent is to provide a relatively granular examination of a global condition; individuals and societies regularly leverage economic power to gain benefit at the expense of the less fortunate. The Puppet project proposes to answer a question that underscores current worldwide inequality: to what extent will humans deprive others for their personal gain?"- Aaron Wintersong

Student Art Work

Greg Philbrook

One

Inform 7
DTC 338 Games for Art, Prof. Kathi Rick
project launch



"As you explore the house in "one," you will find yourself faced with morally ambiguous choices. "one" is not a traditional text-based adventure game, as there is no true ending. The game has a definite beginning, but it only concludes when you as a player decide to end it. The game is as much an experiment with content as it is with form. Though "one" is far from finished, the current version gives the player a brief look at the game's questions on morality and narrative." - Greg Phibrook

Student Art Work

Team project (see below)

Autovation

Unity 3d, Mateio, Junaio
HUM 338 Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch



"Using an iterative design process, with input from Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) and Dick Hannah Dealerships, we are developing "Autovation," an interactive augmented reality environment about innovative car technology. To create this project, we have researched over 100 design ideas involving digital media installations from across the world in fields such as art, education, business, and science. Ideas that best related to the audience and exhibit goals were selected and expanded upon. As augmented reality became the front-runner of technologies for further exploration, the project goals were narrowed to analyze the applications of the emerging technological medium." - Autovation Team: Jason Clarke, Jason Cook, Hunter Crawford, Natalya Gruntkovskiy, Jacob Hochhalter, Madi Kozacek, Michael Langlois, Kerri Lingo, Anaya Martella

Student Art Work

MTRI Fellows (see below)

Dick Hannah Customer Care

HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery Mobile Framework, iOS & Android Dev Tools
Mobile Tech Research Initiative: DTC 478, DTC 477, DTC 338, DTC 336
project launch



"The Mobile Tech Research Initiative (MTRI) was a special summer program that taught students to produce cutting edge environments in mobile media. MTRI focused on the imagination, conceptualization, and production of smartphone app technology, spanning both front-end design to back-end development. The culmination of the program was a smartphone app for the iPhone, called "Dick Hannah Customer Care," developed for Dick Hannah Dealerships, a leading car dealer in the Pacific Northwest. MTRI Fellows: Hunter Crawford, Natalya Gruntkovskiy, Michael Langlois, Kerri Lingo, Anaya Martella, Chad McClure, Brian McGovern, Artem Popov, Kathleen Schultheis, Margarete Strawn

Student Art Work

Geoff Wallace

Impact

Arduino, Resolume Avenue, Ableton Live
DTC 476 Digital Literacies, Dr. John Barber
project launch



"IMPACT/backlash is an interactive multimedia project envisioned, conceptualized, and in development at Washington State University Vancouver. It is created by Geoff Wallace, a senior in The Creative Media and Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver. Utilizing Arduino sensor-based technology, IMPACT/backlash translates analogue cues into digital signals. This, in turn, produces behaviors in the form of video clips, sound responses, robotic light movements and smoke machine activation. The end result is that the drumkit becomes an interface for multimedia performance." - Geoff Wallace

Exhibit 08 / Remix / 12.11

Professor Will Luers / DTC 338: Remix

  • Remix: the practice of appropriating pre-existing forms as source material and giving shape to something new.

Remix, as a creative impulse, is as old as human culture, perhaps older if we consider mimicry in nature. In the production of digital and web objects, remix is unavoidable. Digital objects are made of code, a universal language that we link, copy and paste at a pace and on a scale never seen in human history. Remix culture is our culture.

The projects in Issue 8 of the Student Research Gallery come from three different CMDC classes. Most are from DTC 338 Remix Culture (Spring 2011), where students were exposed to remix art in various historical and contemporary forms of writing, music, visual art, and cinema. Concepts such as authorship, reproduction, fragmentation, simultaneity, collage, montage, juxtaposition, detournément and mash-up were the spring boards for students to develop their own practice-based research. Through short creative exercises, collaborative experiments and individual projects, students discover their own ways of generating new forms out of appropriated media.

The works featured in Issue 8 stand out because their authors pay attention to the unique materiality of their sources – let the materiality dictate the direction of the work – and because of the care in the design and execution of the final remix object.

pdf download: Exhibit 8
Student Art Work

Liz Wade

Accidental Findings: a photographic challenge

HTML/CSS/Javascript/Graphics website
DTC 355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


"I don't usually allow myself the time to wander, and when I do, I decide where to turn and where to stop. But I wanted a chance to be challenged. I drove to a random area of town and stepped out with my camera, two lenses, and a pair of dice. The dice dictated my next move...To my surprise, in these unplanned and apparently dull locations, I found an abundance of photographic opportunities." - Liz Wade

Student Art Work

Mikhail Oparin

Love Poem

HTML/CSS/Flash/Video website
DTC 475 Language, Texts & Technology, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



"Love Poem by Richard Brautigan, a one-line poem, is recited by 17 different people over and over again. Each video communicates a feeling, or an emotion in a different way. It delivers a different experience, thus creating a story inside the viewer's head through reciting and repeating this one sentence. The project is a form of textual remediation, consisting of hyperlinks that open individual video clips. It is an experiment with mixing textual and audio-visual forms that in a process create a non-linear story." - Mikhail Oparin

Student Art Work

Kathleen Schultheis

Dance Mosaic

Video
Remix Culture, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



"This project isn't an original idea, but true to remix, borrows existing material in the creation of an original piece. While I was working on this, I started thinking of Nam June Paik's work, and thought it would be fun to create a sort of dance mosaic; kind of a dance within a dance. I incorporated several effects, including zoom in, zoom out, mirror, reverse and lighting. I'm pleased with how the dance clips fit with the music. I tried to make linkages from one clip to the next (e.g., the penguin tap dance leading to Fred Astaire tap dancing)." - Kathleen Schultheis

Student Art Work

Stephanie Bailey

Multicolored Noise

HTML, CSS, jQuery
Remix Culture, Prof. Will Luers
project launch
about page



"Multicolored Noise, focuses on the cause-and-effect relationships between industrialization, the environment, and people. The layering and overall busy-ness of the page are meant to imitate the constant noise and chaos that we are surrounded by everywhere we go. The audio is made up of unrelated sounds that together sound dull and muddled, much the background noises we've grown accustomed to." - Stephanie Bailey

Student Art Work

Margarete Strawn

Momento Mori

HTML, CSS, jQuery
Remix Culture, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



"I wanted to incorporate images that were abstract and layered upon each other to form a complex moving image that would not be overbearing. The audio is a mixture of many songs that were sampled from genres that don't necessarily blend together to create a maelstrom of varying emotions. As the images progress it changes from the faster dark night into indistinct ghostly shapes being transformed into cybernetic." - Margarete Strawn

Student Art Work

Rick Vodicka

Dance Mix

Video
Remix Culture, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



"I have embraced the spirit of the mash-up in order to create a glorious amalgamation of four of my most beloved music videos found on YouTube. Consider this a loving homage to that which inspires me the most." - Rick Vodicka

Exhibit 07 / Graphic Novels / 08.11

Professor John Barber / DTC 338: Graphic Novels

  • Can digital graphic novels productively promote social consciousness and civic engagement?
  • If so, what forms might such digital graphic novels take?

The first question drove the action research portion of the course. The second question promoted theory into practice. Students read and responded to several digital graphic novels and demonstrated knowledge by conceiving and constructing digital graphic novels focusing on social consciousness and/or civic engagement as their final project. 

Generally speaking, graphic novels are long-form works in the medium of comics noted for their ability to juxtapose images, text, visual rhetoric, and multiple literacies over a perceived timeframe to create a believable and sustainable narrative engagement with the reader.

Each work in this exhibit foregrounds significant and interesting changes as the traditional print-based forms of graphic novels are remediated by the narrative affordances of socially collaborative digital multimedia, and each proves that digital graphic novels might serve as effective media for promoting social consciousness and civic engagement.

pdf download: Exhibit 7
Student Art Work

Nicholas Hill, Mikhail Oparin, Hunter Crawford, Margarete Strawn

Revolution

HTML/CSS/Javascript/Graphics website, 18.6 MB
DTC 338 Graphic Novels, Prof. John Barber
project launch


"Revolution was conceived as a fictional story that explores one character's awakening to the need to be critical of news sources. We created a design that utilizes digital technologies to explore the multimedia presentation of a graphic novel. We included a media type not normally found in graphic novels (video) and not only made it fit with the genre, but used it to advanced and enhance the theme of the story. We were able to accomplish this by adhering to a basic characteristic of the cartoon - amplification through simplification applied to a video animation. Maintaining the same visual style also helps in unifying the video with the comic panels." - Nicholas Hill

Student Art Work

Kyle Schaeffer, Melody Jensen, Jon Exe & Liz Wade

Split Decision

HTML/CSS/Javascript/Graphics website, 19.2 MB
DTC 338 Graphic Novels, Prof. John Barber
project launch


"During our early brainstorming sessions, we wanted to include time travel and alternate realities. From the very start, we aspired to have a storyline that the reader could manipulate as they read through. One plan was to use alternate realities to display one string of the story and then, through reader involvement, open up other paths the story could take. Through the use of alternate realities, we also wanted to allow the reader to see from various points of view by being able to switch between the different realities." - Kyle Schaeffer

Student Art Work

Maria Konovalchik, Kerri Lingo, Josh Lovejoy & Christopher Morrison

El Encarcelamiento

HTML/CSS/Javascript/Photography website, 14.9 MB
DTC 338 Graphic Novels, Prof. John Barber
project launch


"The title, based on ‘incarceration', denotes the common misconceptions standard Americans have toward Latinos and immigration from a legal standpoint. In order to create a localized and relatable view of illegal immigration and deportation, we chose to focus on Hector Lopez, a young man who was deported from what he considers to be his homeland. Using Hector's story as an internal framework, we will include research documentation that will help construct an experience that is both enlightening and a motivation for change." - (from the group's introduction)

Student Art Work

Alisha Rast & Matt Schwartz

Childhood's End

pdf book and powerpoint, 12.4 MB
DTC 338 Graphic Novels, Prof. John Barber
project launch



"In the beginning, we wondered if a digital graphic novel could be a viable form for getting this story out into society. Ultimately, Alisha and I both agreed that it was. We feel that this is a new and exciting way to get people to take a look around at their world. As the old adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words." - Matt Schwartz

Student Art Work

Jacob Hochhalter & Brian McGovern

Captured

HTML/CSS website with campus location Beetags for mobile, 17.1 MB
DTC 338 Graphic Novels, Prof. John Barber
project launch


"In our story, an un-named VanCougar photographer travels to certain places. The reader/user would need to go to those places to scan the Beetag. The Beetag takes the reader to the next chapter or panel to continue the story. This lets the reader/user be immersed in the story" - Brian McGovern

Exhibit 06 | 11.10

The work of these students won the newly-created "Honorable Mention" award at the International Digital Media and Arts Association 2010 conference in Vancouver, Canada.

Three years ago we launched The Yellow Cat Gallery & Media Lounge to provide a place for Digital Technology & Culture (DTC) students to exhibit their expertise with digital media to a larger audience than possible on the WSUV campus. At the time, the DTC program had just added more hands-on experience with technology in the curriculum, and students were excited about showing what they were learning in their courses.

Fast forward to fall 2010. The program is now called The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program, and students are gaining even more in-depth knowledge about digital technologies and applying this knowledge to various research foci regarding digital culture and civic engagement. The works featured in Exhibit 11.10 of The Yellow Cat Gallery are those produced by students for their classes throughout the last year. Additionally, these works received the newly-created "Honorable Mention" award at the Student Showcase portion of the 2010 International Digital Media and Arts Association Conference focusing on "The Digital Narrative," 4-6 November 2010, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Historically, the organization has only given one award—1st place. This year, however, it added the "Honorable Mention" because the judges were so impressed with the scope and breadth of the CMDC students' work as demonstrated in these five projects. "Downtown in 3-D," by Reed Rotondo and Ross Swanson, is a 3-D visualization and simulation of downtown Vancouver created for the Vancouver's Downtown Association and is currently used on the organization's website. Using Google Earth as its platform, this project solved the research problem of how users might navigate Downtown Vancouver, Washington, from a "birds-eye view." 3-D models of many of the businesses and attractions have been created using Google SketchUp. A combination of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and KML places the 3-D models on the Earth, and brings this virtual Downtown to life with the click of a button. The MOVE Lab Fellows: Aaron May, Nick Hill, Samantha Goelze, and Geoff Wallace produced "Media Scare" in response to the research question of how sensor-based technology might be utilized to produce a multimedia, interactive virtual environment that simulates the haunted house experience.

The "XXI Brautiganism" by Mikhail Oparin and Christina Broussard-Pearson is a visual and modern interpretation of Richard Brautigan's poetry from the 1960s. This video installation was part of a live performance piece in the spring 2010 on the WSUV campus as well as a stand-alone art work at an outdoor exhibit during the month of June in downtown Vancouver. It is currently on exhibit at the Clark County Historical Museum as part of the new Brautigan Library through January 2011.

"The Fort Vancouver Mobile Project" by students in DTC 354 Mobile Storytelling is a mobile app for iPhones and Androids as well as video and sound-based narrative highlighting the history of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. In both cases, students are answering the research question, "How might mobile, digital technology promote deep and rich experiences with shared cultural and historical places?" Their work offers video documentation of the project. "Between Rooms and Voices" by students in DTC 354 Mobile Storytelling is a project involving iPods, gallery show in Vancouver, and a live Flash Choir choral performance in Portland taking place in December. The research question here is, "How might digital technology promote unique opportunities for collaboration in community cultural events?" Their work documents their answer.

As these works show, video is a creative medium of the 21st Century, a hybrid mode of expression that is both potent and visually appealing, covers a wide range of literary and art genres such as storytelling and portraiture, and strategies like metaphor and montage. Viewed together, these works provide a unique look into the kinds of skills that students in the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program learn in their courses, speak to talents each possess individually, and demonstrate a wide-spectrum of cutting edge undergraduate research in the field of digital media.

We are, as always, proud of their accomplishments.

Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber
Student Art Work

Reed Rotondo and Ross Swanson

"Downtown in 3-D"

Video, 347.7 MB, 1:45
DTC 476 Digital Literacies

Student Art Work

Aaron May, Nick Hill, Samantha Goelze, and Geoff Wallace

"Media Scare"

Video
Move Lab Fellows

Student Art Work

Mikhail Oparin and Christina Broussard-Pearson

"The XXI Century Brautiganism: A Visual Poem"

Video, 20.1 MB, 3:57
FA 331 Science and Technology

Student Art Work

Aaron May

"The Fort Vancouver Mobile Project"

Video
DTC 354 Digital Storytelling

Student Art Work

Aaron Hahn

"Between Rooms and Voices"

Video
DTC 354 Digital Storytelling

Exhibit 05 | 05.08

As these works show, video is the creative medium of the 21st Century, a hybrid mode of expression-as potent as writing and as visually appealing as photography-that covers a wide range of literary and art genres such as storytelling and portraiture, and strategies like metaphor and montage.

With such a broad spectrum of possibilities, students in Fauske's class were guided to produce works that experiment with continuity, portraiture, the associational montage, and stock footage.

The first video is Hatch's whimsical "Chroma Key," a piece that, as the title suggests, experiments with the process of chroma key. What seems at first as a light-hearted exploration of a particular technique actually gives way to a wry portrait of each, capturing the desire for a carefree adventure behind the wheel of an automobile, travel to exotic locales, or fear of chaos and failure.

Cottingham's "Art in the Dark" aims to represent "nothingness" in her high-energy remix of a rock performance by The Subterranean Jack and fire dancing by The Poi Zen Sisters. The result is a sonic and visual spectacle that is, ironically, as much about movement as it is about darkness.

Hicks, an avid mountain-biker, creates a rousing portrait of fellow biking enthusiast, Jason Moon. The cutaways from Moon standing fixed in front of his bike store as he recounts for the audience his love of the sport, to his wild and harrowing ride down the mountain, provide much excitement and dynamism to the piece.

Finally, "Learning to Make the Right Choices with Lydia" by Erin Wilkinson is a narrative piece that takes a poke at capitalism and greed. Torn between her anti-capitalist ethos and the possibility of living a better life, Lydia chooses to drive off into the sunset leaving her values and humanity behind.

This exhibit provides a unique look into the kinds of skills that students in the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program learn in their courses and speaks to talents each possess individually. We are, as always, proud of their accomplishments.

- Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber
Student Art Work

Michael Hatch

"Chroma Key"

Video, 3.3MB 1'30"
DTC 338 Experimental Video

Student Art Work

Cara Cottingham

"Art in the Dark"

Video, 56.5MB 6'24"
DTC 338 Experimental Video

Student Art Work

Ryan Hicks

"Jason Moon"

Video, 25.1MB 3'25"
DTC 338 Experimental Video

Student Art Work

Erin Wilkinson

"Learning to Make the Right Choices with Lydia"

Video, 4.8MB 2'21"
DTC 338 Experimental Video

Exhibit 04 | 04.08

The spring semester's courses provided a rich environment that fostered the creation of many digital media works by students in the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program.

The works featured in this Exhibit reflect some of the most compelling to emerge from DTC 336 Composition and Design, DTC 335 Digital Animation, and DTC 338 Special Topics: Electronic Literature. We will continue to feature works from these courses in the next exhibit.

The first two, Mallisa Rainey's "Light in August" and Mike Shelby's "Our Parents Had More," were created as part of the university reading project—Visions of the Road that was co-sponsored by the Digital Technology and Culture Program and the WSUV Library. "Visions of the Road" translated print-based works of literature whose overarching theme focused on the impact of the journey upon American culture into digital contexts. Rainey's video is inspired by William Faulkner's Light in August and tells of Lina Grove's search for the father of her unborn child. As the artist tells us, her goal is to "capture Lina's self-reflective mood and feeling, while telling her story in a an engaging way." Shelby's video is a response to Douglas Copeland's Gneration X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture." Shelby intends for his "collage of background images quickly passing by the car" to represent "the fast-paced, almost chaotic tone of the book's story." The cartoonish nature of his work—and as he says, "the attention to pop art (and the word "pop" itself)" is meant to "reflect popular and consumer culture, central themes in Coupland's book." Both artists used Final Cut in producing their work.

Michael Hatch and Amberlyn Boyd's animation, "Absolutely," constitutes the final project for the course in Digital Animation. Using Flash and After Effects, the two artists respond to the Nine Days' song, "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)" from the 2000 CD The Madding Crowd. The clever use of rotoscoping combined with flashbacks and the reoccurring trope of the rose provide a strong narrative element to the song. As Hatch and Boyd point out "the song expresses the feeling of angst experienced during the deterioration of a relationship" and "combination of streamlined backgrounds, drawings, and photography demonstrates [an]other reality."

Electronic Literature was a special topics course intended to introduce students this genre of digital art. Greg Zschomler's "War" is a final project for that course. In this work, Zschomler draws upon biblical allusions to show the moral ambiguities of war. The outcome is a moving video essay.

This exhibit provides a unique look into the kinds of skills that students in the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program learn in their courses and speaks to talents each possess individually. We are proud of their accomplishments.

- Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber


Student Art Work

Malissa Rainey

"Light in August"

Video Essay, 6.9MB 4'53"
DTC 336 Composition and Design

Student Art Work

Mike Shelby

"Our Parents Had More"

Video Essay 6.9MB 4'53"
DTC 336 Composition and Design

Student Art Work

Michael Hatch & Amberlyn Boyd

"Absolutely"

Video Essay, 6.7MB 2'00"
DTC 335 Digital Animation

Student Art Work

Greg Zschomler

"War"

Flash Animation, 752KB
DTC 338 Electronic Literature

Exhibit 03 | 03.08

The 5th anniversary of the Iraq War came and went on March 20th. Presidential candidates, busy campaigning on issues relating to the economy, health care, race relations, and gas prices, much like those already in office, gave little notice to the conflict that has taken over 4000 American lives and countless lives of Iraqi citizens.

Not surprisingly, though, many young people do pay attention and are influenced by the violence hidden inside the covers of their newspapers or casually mentioned in news found on the web, for it has been young men and women called by the government to give their lives for "Iraqi freedom." The works featured in this issue of the Yellow Cat Gallery and Media Lounge draw from students' reactions to and views of war, violence, and the hope that lies beyond. While none of the websites or the video can be categorized as activist work, they all four present poignant narratives about the horror and lasting damage wrought by violence stemming from war and/or brutality.

The first work in the exhibit is Scott Fraser's "Shades of War." In talking about this piece Fraser tells us that "as with many Americans who love this country and want to do whatever we can to protect . . . America . . . I have become increasingly disenchanted with the 'War on Terror' and how it is being handled. I am also quite interested in the emotional and psychological effects of color on people. I am not anti-war and have never been an activist of any kind, so it felt a little strange to me to be creating a piece with war imagery. The purpose of the piece is to cause the viewer to examine each picture a little more than they might were there visible navigation tools. This piece forces viewers to scroll over the image searching for the way to advance. Hopefully, this will guide viewers through the images and cause them to consider the words written and the colors associated with the images."

Ben Hook's website, "Atrocity," is "an exploration of the brutality of man." In this piece Hook tells us that he "wanted to showcase some of the major atrocities in history in a way that draws the reader in, but does not attempt to make an opinion or judgment about any of the events herein." "Atrocity" is Hook's "first attempt at using Adobe Dreamweaver and . . . first piece of Electronic Literature. I hope that the story told within these pages touches everyone who views it in some way, and I urge everyone to further explore this subject, the world will be a better place if we do."

The third work is a video entitled "Bosnia" by Mckenzie Lowery. Lowery's moving narrative, inspired during her visit to the country in the summer 2007, shows Bosnians having returned to a "better life" years following the Civil War that claimed "102,000 casualties." Images of vibrant beaches, lush countryside, and cemeteries, suggest both the hope that has sprung up in Bosnia—as well as the pain the country's inhabitants still feel over the lives lost in that conflict.

The final piece featured this issue is Mallisa Rainey's "The Watermark: An Interactive Bedtime Story." It is a work of hypertext fiction about twin sisters who terror increases after the death of their mother. Influenced by the work of Deena Larsen's hypertext mystery, "Disappearing Rain." Rainey uses the mouseover technique to shift images back and forth, producing tension and a sense of horror.

- Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber
Student Art Work

Scott Fraser

"Shades of War"

Website
DTC 338 Electronic Literature

Student Art Work

Ben Hook

"Atrocity"

Website
DTC 338 Electronic Literature

Student Art Work

Mckenzie Lowrey

"Bosnia"

Video Essay, 8.5MB 1'51"
DTC 338 Electronic Literature

Student Art Work

Mallisa Rainey

"The Watermark"

Electronic Literature—Website
DTC 338 Electronic Literature

Exhibit 02 | 02.08

The complex relationship humans have with technology emerges as the theme of this month's exhibit.

Matthew Hope, Donald Hawthorne, and Tim Steinman's short video, "Information Sickness," for example, explores the notion of information overload. A narrative about a young man who cannot escape his computer no matter where he goes offers us a wicked reminder, according to the artists, that "technology is all around . . . and sometimes it becomes a bit overbearing."

While "Information Sickness" takes a dark look at the ubiquity of computers, Paula Caudilla's animated narrative, "A Day in the Life of Rei-Chan, an Otaku," examines our obsession of those objects computers provide us. In Caudilla's story, Rei-Chan is an Otaku, an obsessed fan of anime and manga so involved in her fantasy world that she can only see life from that one perspective, neglecting or negating all else. For this piece Caudilla created over 150 hand-drawn sketches that she linked together in Flash.

Thought of in Western tradition as sinister, gauche, and evil, the left hand symbolizes that aspect of humanity driven to error. Brandon Thorstenson makes use of the metaphor of the left hand to wax philosophical about contemporary life in his video essay, "The Five Fingers of My Left Hand." The content and cadence of his writing exploits technology to make his point that contemporary society, so disconnected from humanity, has gone awry.

Nikki Farland utilizes the technology of digital photography to "illustrate [her] interpretation of the season's transition." The eight images that make up "Leaves of a Season," offer an exploration of the natural beauty that surrounds us. Taken in and around the Pacific Northwest, Farland's images move away from views of mountains and rugged coastline we come to expect and focus instead on those vistas many of us share: trees, birds, and parks with children. It is through the technology of the digital camera that she brings us together in harmony.

The breadth of these views helps us to see how technology impacts our lives for worse or better. It is difficult to walk away from these works without thinking about the complicated relationship we have with machines, computing or otherwise.

- Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber
Student Art Work

Paula Caudilla

"A Day in the Life of Rei-Chan, an Otaku"

Flash Animation, 4.3MB
FA 434 Time-Based Media

Student Art Work

Hope, Hawthorne, Steinman

"Information Sickness"

Video, 6.1MB, 2'44"
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia

Student Art Work

Nikki Farland

"Leaves of A Season"

Digital Photography
FA 434 Time-Based Media

Student Art Work

Brandon Thorstenson

"The Five Fingers of My Left Hand"

Video Essay, 2.3MB, 1'36"
DTC 476 Digital Literacies

Exhibit 01 | 01.08

Nina Westerberg's piece, "A Simmified Life," is an example of machinima, an emergent art form that combines filmmaking with computer games and 3D technologies.

Using the world of The Simms as her focal point, Westerberg asks, "What does it mean when we can possess anything we want?" Slightly autobiographical in nature, the work is a wry commentary of consumerism.

"Exo-Elimination," a video by Kyle Ralston & Matthew Grammer, offers frenetic motion with no predetermined path or goal in mind. Driven by high-energy percussive sound, the work invites the viewer to reconsider the value we place on groundedness.

Sarah Campeau & Kristen Weigand's, "I Hear My Train," a haunting video that combines the interview genre with the technique of photomontage, looks at the competing need for adventure and the desire for stability—with trains functioning as the metaphor of that tension.

The final work, Mike Gowan's sardonic "Technology Through the Ages," is an animated "history" that pokes fun at Luddites and Geeks alike. A Flash piece hand-drawn by Gowans, the work forces us simultaneously to laugh at and reexamine our relationship with technology.

All of the works shown provide ironic critiques of the very medium they are working in.

- Curators: Dene Grigar & John F. Barber
Student Art Work

Nina Westerberg

"A Simmified Life"

Machinima, 7MB, 04'25
FA 434 Time-Based Media

Student Art Work

Kyle Ralston & Matthew Grammer

"Exo-Elimination"

Video, 64MB, 03'22
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia

Student Art Work

Sarah Campeau & Kristen Weigand

"I Hear My Train"

Video, 4MB, 02'48
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia

Student Art Work

Mike Gowans

"Technology Through the Ages"

Animation, 1.9MB
DTC 477 Advanced Multimedia